Chef Trent’s Favorite Spices

6 Single origin Spices

$55.99 $60.00

“These are my favorite spices that I use daily to elevate a variety of cuisines and seasonal recipes that I cook. Cumin and coriander act as the foundation of flavor often paired with garlic and onion. Black garlic is my secret weapon that adds an irresistible umami punch. Maras Chile flakes, cured sumac and California sea salt flakes work together to make a delicious spicy, tangy garnish.” – Chef Trent Blodgett

Tips for Success

  • These spices make the perfect blend and can be used in every meal to enhance the flavors..

  • Try not to pour spices out of the jar over a steaming pot or pan as the steam can get in the jar and cause further clumping.

  • Grind whole spices just before cooking for maximum flavor.
  • Origin

    Black Garlic Powder
    What happens when you hold fresh white garlic bulbs grown in San Antonio, Texas hostage in a room heated to 130 degrees Fahrenheit for two months? The Maillard reaction! When the allium’s natural enzymes break down its sugars, a caramelization process takes place at the speed of, appropriately, molasses—contrary to popular belief this is not “fermentation.” The now-black bulbs, which have a deep, rich sweetness with notes of fig and balsamic vinegar, are then dehydrated and ground into a powder.
    Made from seawater collected off the coast of Northern California near Humboldt, these high-grade, crisp, clean finishing flakes are made in small batches with artisanal technique—a delicate dance between filtration and fire evaporation—that seeks to achieve the perfect brine for the crystallization process. As salt crystals form over many hours on the surface of the oceanic concentrate, they sink to the bottom where they are raked, drained, and dried.
    Farmers in Kahramanmaraş, Turkey grow Maras peppers—also known as Aleppo across the border in Syria, where the civil war has destroyed production—in a fertile plain at the base of Ahir Mountain. Dubbed by the Wall Street Journal as the “Eartha Kitt of chiles” for its sultry heat and slow burn, Maras peppers are harvested in late summer, then sun-dried during the day, and wrapped in cloth at night to “sweat.” This unique regional method traps moisture, boosting the pepper’s trademark “wetness,” also enhanced by the cut size of the flakes, which plays a role in how much salt and oil they will hold. Naturally regenerative, a single Maras pepper seed grows into a plant that yields hundreds of peppers, and we hand-select each one after harvest.
    In the limestone hills of Gaziantep in southeastern Turkey, sumac is a drought-tolerant plant that grows wildly near pistachio fields. Since there is no formal cultivation, the late-summer harvest is done by villagers, and at times, a single batch of our sumac is produced by over 100 people. The key is knowing which raw materials to accept—we seek out sumac with a sunny tang that turns into a pucker. Rather than sun-drying, the bright red berry is chopped and packed in salt to cure, preserving the fresh-picked floral aroma of the fruit.
    The Faiyum Oasis is fertile basin of the Western Desert, southwest of Cairo in the Nile River Valley. Its vast Lake Qarun—the third-largest in Egypt—nourishes many crops, including figs, grapes, olives and coriander, an herb prized by ancient Egyptians as a digestive aid and rheumatism reliever (coriander seeds were found in Egyptian tombs). Our coriander is organically grown and harvested two weeks after the seeds of the bright-green, slender-stalked plant turn light brown. The seeds are then dried under the hot sun to develop their lemony flavor and floral sweetness.
    In the steep and jagged Hindu Kush Mountants of Afghanistan, a rare and ancient varietal of cumin—a botanical cousin to the common variety—grows wildly, and according to Milkstreet, black cumin derives its extra warmth and pungency from its “native terroir.” Local villagers handpick these highly climate-resilient seeds, rarely seen outside of local communities until recently, by hand and dry them under the blistering Afghan sun to concentrate flavors even more. We work with Roots of Peace, an organization that helps the communities of war-torn areas prosper through agricultural export.

    FAQ

    How old are these spices?

    We purchase what we need every year right after the spices are harvested. These spices are as fresh as you can get. They are not sitting in a warehouse for multiple years. The oldest spices we carry will be one year old compared to the commodity market which warehouses spices for 10+ years before selling them to you.

    Do you have recipes to go with these spices?

    Yes! We have an ever expanding recipe library of chef tested recipes. Click here to learn more. Please shoot us an email if there are any recipes you would like to see at support@spicetribe.com

    Can I buy spices for corporate gifts?

    Yes you can. Please direct all corporate gifts related inquiries to wholesale@spicetribe.com.