Wild Cured Sumac

Lemon Tang, Fresh Berries, Umami

$5.00 $10.00

Sumac is an amazing finishing spice that adds a burst of fruity citrus tang to everything you sprinkle it on. Our Wild Cured Sumac is cured with salt helping it retain a freshness that is unmatched while also bringing an entirely new funky element to it that makes it a pantry staple.

What's Inside

Ingredients : Ground sumac, Salt

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No Additives, GMOs, Or Fillers
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Glass Jar Net Weight: 1.75oz
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100% Compostable Pouch Net Weight: 16oz

Tips for Success

  • Sumac is a flavor enhancer much like salt and lemon are.
  • Use this spice as a finishing spice so you don’t lose the nuances of tangy fruitiness with long cooking times.
  • Origin

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    In the limestone hills of Gaziantep in southeastern Turkey, sumac is a drought-tolerant plant that grows wildly near pistachio fields. Since there is no formal cultivation, the late-summer harvest is done by villagers, and at times, a single batch of our sumac is produced by over 100 people. The key is knowing which raw materials to accept—we seek out sumac with a sunny tang that turns into a pucker. Rather than sun-drying, the bright red berry is chopped and packed in salt to cure, preserving the fresh-picked floral aroma of the fruit.

    FAQ

    What does sumac taste like?

    Sumac has a lemony tang with a berry-like undertone. Ours is cured with salt giving it an added layer of umami funkiness not found in store bought sumac.

    How do you eat sumac?

    Sumac makes an excellent an amazing rub for lamb, chicken and fish as well as perfect sprinkled in salads or roasted veggies. We also love it mixed with salt and chile flakes on a cocktail rim.

    Is sumac good for you?

    “Sumac is rich in a variety of nutrients and antioxidant compounds. Early research suggests it may be beneficial for blood sugar control and relief of exercise-induced muscle pain.” (https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/sumac-benefits-uses-and-forms)